Why I usually like Bob Garfield

excerpt from his final AdReview column in Advertising Age:

On the other hand, I harbor no regrets whatsoever for eviscerating the most repugnant advertisers of my tenure: Benetton, for ostentatiously exploiting disease, war, religion and the victims of social injustice to push pricey mix ‘n’ match separates; Calvin Klein, arsonist, for using increasingly aggressive sexual images to ignite outrage, knowing that the media engines and ladders would inevitably race to the scene; GoDaddy, for trafficking in the most puerile and degrading T&A; Swiftboat Veterans for Truth, for smears of the ugliest kind (2004); Camel and Kool (1991), the lowest of the tobacco-marketing low, for using cartoon characters to cultivate children; Nintendo (1994), for telling adolescents to “hock a loogie at life”; and General Motors, for 1) jumping on the gruesome tragedy of 9/11 to sell Chevys and Pontiacs with its perverse “Keep America Rolling” 3,000-dead sale-a-bration (2001), and 2) having the gall on Earth Day, after decades of lobbying against emissions and mileage standards, to celebrate “environmental progress” (1990).

This, I said, was akin to “John Wayne Gacy celebrating the International Year of the Child.”

The AdReview staff was proud of that one.

After 25 years critiquing the ad industry in Advertising Age, Bob Garfield is retiring his weekly reviews. “For Ad Age, he will be extending his thought leadership on the digital revolution with a column titled “Listenomics.” He will also be launching a limited consulting practice in association with several strategic partners to be announced later in the spring. […] Mr. Garfield’s opinions on advertising, doled out in the weekly Ad Review, have challenged the industry, rankled creatives and rewarded great work.” (source)

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