Historical Issues #2: Soviet Film

There are such treasures hiding in the stacks, and really, they don’t make journal covers like they used to.  I coincidentally found these journals the same week that the Russian Film Symposium is happening in Pittsburgh, so I knew it was fated that I should share some of the images.

Soviet Film cover 1978 number 10

1978:no. 10 (257) Actor Oleg Yankovsky

Soviet Film 1978 number 9

1978:no. 9 (256): Actress Svetlana Toma

Soviet Film 1977 number 8

1977:no. 8 (243): Komaki Kurihara and Yuri Solomin in “Melodies of the White Night”, a Soviet-Japanese co-production.

Soviet Film 1976 number 11

1976:no. 11 (234): Sergei Bondarchuk on location during the shooting of “Steppe” based on the story of the same title by Anton Chekhov.

Soviet Film 1975 number 8

1975:no.8 (219): Actress Natalia Varley

Soviet Film 1972 number 2

1972:no.2 (177): Asanali Ashimov, the Kazakh actor who played in “Crossroad”, “The End of the Ataman,” “Kyz-Zhibek”

Soviet Film 1975 number 4

1975:no.4 (215): Film actress Ludmila Gurchenko (“Carnival Night”, “Girl with a Guitar”, “Baltic Sky”, “Factory Town”, “Open Book”, “Vaniushin’s Children”, “Old Walls”, and others)

Soviet Film 1972 number 1

1972:no.1 (176): the Ukrainian actress Larisa Kadochnikova

Soviet Film 1969 number 7

1969:no.7 (146): Actress Tatyana Doronina

Sorry about the weird image quality.  If anyone knows how to fix that or make it so the scanner doesn’t put those wavy lines in, please tell me for next time!

See also: my previous “Historical Issues” posts

(I provide a link because, for some reason, WordPress insists on the “Filed Under” link below not linking just to my blog, but to the entire world. psh.)

Things in my orbit

Some rumblings of progress in the area of open data in archaeology

Library 2.0 podcasts (haven’t listened to any, just discovered they exist)

Making History Podcast

Flickr stream of creative business cards

Watched this movie over the weekend:


Overall it was pretty weird and terrible, but the first few minutes were some of the most visually interesting I’ve seen in awhile, thanks to the quick cuts and linked imagery. When I say the movie was terrible, though, I mean it really was a disappointment. Not scary, and really there was nothing to the plot and the characters. Pauline Kael has an excellent (in my opinion) review of it, published in the New Yorker:
Pauline Kael, The Current Cinema, “Labyrinths,” The New Yorker, December 24, 1973, p. 68.

Unfortunately I can’t give any quotes because I don’t have access to any electronic version, and the book I read it in is at home.

I registered for the ARLIS/NA conference in Boston, in April. Should be exciting…finally an excuse to design my own business cards!

An article on anarchist archives/collections/resources in College & Research Libraries News caught my eye. It’s a nice article, but I’m surprised the Centre International de Recherches sur l’Anarchisme (CIRA) wasn’t included. Granted, the pages of this newsletter/journal are tinier than most.

visualizing the LCSH, weeks 50 & 51

150 Educational films [May Subd Geog] [sp2001000481]
* 680 This heading is used as a topical heading for works about films that are intended to impart knowledge and information, including those for classroom viewing. Works about films designed to impart skills or techniques to general audiences, typically in a “how‑to” manner, are entered under Instructional films. When used as topical headings they are subdivided by the appropriate geographic, topical, and/or form subdivisions.

150 Gymnastics for boys [May Subd Geog] [sp2009008865]
* 550 BT Gymnastics for children CANCEL
* 550 BT Sports for children

(New York Times image attributed to Frederic J. Brown)

150 Machinery in motion pictures [Not Subd Geog] [sp2009009670]
053 PN1995.9.M18
550 BT Motion pictures



151 NGC 300 (Galaxy) [sp2009009615]
667 This heading is not valid for use as a geographic subdivision.
451 UF Dun 530 (Galaxy)
451 UF GC 169 (Galaxy)
451 UF H 2359 (Galaxy)
451 UF NGC300 (Galaxy)
550 BT Spiral galaxies

(image from nasa.gov)

150 Peddlers and peddling in art CANCEL
150 Peddlers in art [Not Subd Geog] [sp 85099130]
450 UF Peddlers and peddling in art [EARLIER FORM OF HEADING]

(“Marchand d’abat-jour, rue Lepic” – Eugène Atget. albumen print (c.1900) from the George Eastman House collection on Flickr.)

150 Precarious employment [May Subd Geog] [sp2009008937]
680 Here are entered works on labor that is poorly paid, unregulated, and lacks job
security.
450 UF Employment, Precarious
550 BT Labor

Gus Powell – from “Voetganger Amsterdam” series
for now I went with a more literal interpretation of “precarious”.

150 Absence in motion pictures [Not Subd Geog] [sp2009009505]
550 BT Motion pictures

150 Ceilings—Decoration [May Subd Geog] [sp2009010550]
550 BT Decoration and ornament

(a picture of a ceiling at the Library of Congress, from my Flickr)

150 Corn—Utilization [May Subd Geog] [sp 86004524]
* 681 Example under Plants, Useful CANCEL
* 681 Example under Plants, Useful; Wildlife utilization

(vintage postcard from Jasperdo’s Flickr photostream)

(USA Today article)
I have actually been to the Corn Palace!

150 Rock musicians in art [Not Subd Geog] [sp2009010571]


(both illustrations by Max Dalton. “Guitar Lessons” discovered via World Famous Design Junkies)

interesting LCSHs for December

From the Library of Congress weekly lists for December 2 and 9, 2009.

Aggressiveness in art [Not Subd Geog] [sp2009009189]


Andy Kehoe – “Kick Us When We’re Down

Androids in literature [Not Subd Geog] [sp2009009278]
Philip K. Dick’s website has a fun gallery of cover images from all the various versions of Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

androids japan cover

Architecture photographers [May Subd Geog] [sp2009009076]

Kim Høltermand“Monolith”

150 Crime in music [sp2009009410]
680 Here are entered works on the depiction of crime in musical compositions. General works on the relationship between crime and music are entered under Music and crime.
550 BT Music
681 Notes under Music and crime

150 Heroines in dance [Not Subd Geog] [sp2009009518]
550 BT Dance

150 Landscapes in music [Not Subd Geog] [sp2009009236]
680 Here are entered works on the depiction of natural landscapes in musical
compositions.
550 BT Music

Mood films [Not Subd Geog] [sp2008025676]
680 This heading is used as a genre/form heading for films that emphasize a mood or
atmosphere rather than a plot.
555 BT Fiction films
The record for the above heading indicates that there’s a genre of Japanese fiction film to which the term “mood film” has been applied. A friend suggested that something like Wavelength might be considered a “mood film”. However, it also seems to be a common term in the advertising field, where it refers to things like this. According to NTC’s Dictionary of Advertising, 2nd ed, a “mood commercial” is a “commercial message designed to establish a particular atmosphere.” Or perhaps a commercial that encourages you to match your fridge to your mood?

Odeon of Agrippa (Athens, Greece) [sp2009008379]
410 UF Agrippa, Odeon of (Athens, Greece)
410 UF Agrippeion (Athens, Greece)
410 UF Ōdeio tou Agrippa (Athens, Greece)
410 UF Odeion of Agrippa (Athens, Greece)
410 UF Odeum of Agrippa (Athens, Greece)
550 BT Theaters—Greece

Odeon of Agrippa
image from http://www.agathe.gr/guide/

The Athenian Agora Excavations website from the American School of Classical Studies at Athens is a lovely example of how archaeological data can be digitized and presented in a clear, interesting way. Also, check out the catalog card on this page. And I thought library catalog cards were messy…

I’m including this next one not because I’m a Potter fan, but because I find it bizarre and amusing that there was probably a discussion (or a lively debate?) about whether Hogwarts should be considered a place or an organization. I guess imaginary places are as worthy of accurate subject headings as real places, or, um, organizations…?
150 Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry (Imaginary place) CANCEL
(C) 150 Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry (Imaginary organization) [Not Subd Geog] [sp 00002633]
450 UF Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry (Imaginary place) [EARLIER FORM
OF HEADING]

150 Legislators’ pets [May Subd Geog] [sp2009009244]
550 BT Pets
Ted Kennedy and pet
In My senator and me : a dog’s eye view of Washington Senator Kennedy’s dog, Splash, follows the senator around for a day and introduces readers to the White House.

There’s also a Presidential pet museum?!

Documenting the Face of America

Last night on my local PBS station, WQED, I stumbled upon the documentary “Documenting the Face of America: Roy Stryker and the FSA/OWI Photographers” (written & directed by Jeanine Isabel Butler). What drew me in immediately was the number of photographs being shown in this program. In the words of the Library of Congress, these photographs are “a landmark in the history of documentary photography”, and it was great to see so many of them presented on-screen while learning about the political and social environment in which they were created.

I took a photographic archives course over the summer, and was impressed by how all the archives students seemed very familiar with the FSA/OWI story, right down to details about how certain photographs had been modified, damaged, preserved etc. I guess it’s understandable that archives students would know more about this than library students, since this collection is probably the type of thing aspiring photo archivists dream about. This documentary was especially nice to watch as a librarian, because it left the viewer with a strong impression of the importance of visual history, and libraries’ & archives’ role in preserving/providing access to that history. It also highlighted Stryker’s insistence that “the file” be kept together when the project was ending; scattering it would greatly reduce its value as documentary evidence of the period, and the strength of its social & political statement. The point was made, on multiple occasions, that many politicians and members of the general public disapproved of the FSA/OWI photography project, and thought the photographs were “stupid”. How fortunate that the Library of Congress was (and has been) able to provide such a good home for these far from “stupid” materials. It’s nice to see such a thoughtful documentary film emphasize the contributions of libraries/archives and the people who care for them.

A review is available here.