Random resources

The International Association of Yoga Therapists has bibliographies online relating to various health issues and yoga. It looks like the freely available ones haven’t been updated since 2006, but the variety of sources they include makes them a good starting point for research. There’s also a digital resource library with downloadable full-text of user-posted conference presentations, handouts, and papers.

And via a list-serv posting, I came across this “StreamNet Library: Fish Data for the Northwest“. According to their mission statement, this library serves…

“the scientific community of the Pacific Northwest and those working in cooperation with the region’s fish and wildlife recovery efforts, who are not otherwise served by a specialized library. We also serve the General Public who are interested in the issues surrounding the Columbia Basin and Salmon Recovery Efforts.[…]
The Library provides access to technical information and research on the Columbia River basin fisheries, ecosystems and other relevant subjects for states in the Pacific Northwest.” 

How cool would it be to be a fish data librarian?

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Things in my orbit

Some rumblings of progress in the area of open data in archaeology

Library 2.0 podcasts (haven’t listened to any, just discovered they exist)

Making History Podcast

Flickr stream of creative business cards

Watched this movie over the weekend:


Overall it was pretty weird and terrible, but the first few minutes were some of the most visually interesting I’ve seen in awhile, thanks to the quick cuts and linked imagery. When I say the movie was terrible, though, I mean it really was a disappointment. Not scary, and really there was nothing to the plot and the characters. Pauline Kael has an excellent (in my opinion) review of it, published in the New Yorker:
Pauline Kael, The Current Cinema, “Labyrinths,” The New Yorker, December 24, 1973, p. 68.

Unfortunately I can’t give any quotes because I don’t have access to any electronic version, and the book I read it in is at home.

I registered for the ARLIS/NA conference in Boston, in April. Should be exciting…finally an excuse to design my own business cards!

An article on anarchist archives/collections/resources in College & Research Libraries News caught my eye. It’s a nice article, but I’m surprised the Centre International de Recherches sur l’Anarchisme (CIRA) wasn’t included. Granted, the pages of this newsletter/journal are tinier than most.

Weekend update

I finally uploaded the annotated bibliography I wrote for one of my classes. It’s on ancient (mostly archaic and classical) Greek art & archaeology. The assignment required us to find a certain number of resources in specific formats, so there’s a lot fewer web resources than I would include in a bibliography I was doing on my own. In fact, I’ve been thinking it would be fun to do a webliography of all the fun and creative online projects I’ve come across in this field. There’s the vast world of 3-D archaeological site modeling, and then there’s all sorts of online exhibitions, image collections, and digital libraries. I have many such sites bookmarked, but I’m sure they’re just the tip of the iceberg. Before I do this I’ll have to see if someone else has already done it.

I’m also working on posts about personal finance resources and an epic overview of my favorite sci-fi books from the past 10 years. (meaning ones I’ve read since 2000, not ones that have been published since then). I’m taking an online workshop on taxonomies and controlled vocabularies through Simmons College, so things might be dull around here until that’s over. I do plan to keep doing the visual LCSH roundup, though, because it’s entertaining.

I’m also ruminating on how to possibly create some simple yet helpful document on entrepreneurship that could be mailed to prisoners requesting information on the topic. A zine would be great, but the postage might overwhelm. It seems there is definitely a need for some easily distributable resource on this topic, at least in Pennsylvania.

Hmm.

Ads of the world

Ads of the world

I just came across this website through my extracurricular blog reading, but it seems like it could be useful for some of the marketing research questions we receive at the library (especially on the elusive topic of online advertising). The ad images and embedded videos can be browsed by media type, region, country, or industry. “Or” being an important word there, because it doesn’t seem like you can combine these categories to refine your search. Using the free text search box and searching by the category names (e.g. “TV Americas”) will return results, but they’re not limited just to ads that are tagged with those terms. Additionally, you can browse logos by category/industry and country. All the examples I looked at included production/creator credits for the ads. It seems like this might be a good way to track marketing trends, although it’s unclear how broad the coverage is. Also, it’s unclear exactly what criteria determine whether ads make it (or don’t make it) onto the site. The “Upload” page seems to imply that most, if not all, the content is submitted by advertising professionals and/or students, aka the people who are responsible for creating the content. Then there’s some sort of editorial/filtering process.

Even if I never end up using this site to help with research questions, I will definitely have fun browsing it. It’s interesting just to see the colors and styles that predominate certain media types, regions, and industries.